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Ethics

Thinking as a hobby (pg. 30 in your textbook)

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B​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​efore endeavoring to write this paper, make sure you’ve read the following essays:
Thinking as a Hobby (pg. 30 in your textbook)
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas (Links to an external site.)
After reading the aforementioned essays, read Chapter 4 (pg. 55), for it details how to write an Issue/Problem Paper. Make sure to read the models by Susan Hernandez (pg. 57-58) and Joey Tyler (pg. 58-59), but make sure to adhere to the organizational strategy detailed toward the bottom of this page (and demonstrated in the accompanying PDF).
For your first Issue/Problem Paper, this is the prompt:
In The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas, most of the people choose to remain. However, some people leave. Please classify those who leave as Grade One, Grade Two, or Grade Three Thinkers (based on William Golding’s Thinking as a Hobby.)
Please adhere to these definitions:
Grade-One Thinkers: offer solutions
Grade-Two Thinkers: detect contradictions
Grade-Three Thinkers: feel instead of think
Make sure to mind the following:
Proofread! Your I/P Paper is worth 100 points.
Make sure that the first sentence of your I/P Paper is your claim.
Diction tips for refuting the opposition can be found on pg. 156-157.
When writing, make sure each assertion (“point”) is coupled with an example. Hence, as noted on pg. 55, you’ll have your “claim,” then your first “point,” and then your first “example.” Following the “example,” you should have a sentence of “commentary.” (“Commentary” simply explains the relevance of your “example,” and it also links your “example” to your “point” and, most importantly, to your “claim.”) For clarification, simply note the examples on pgs. 57-58. Both Susan and Joey follow the “Point/Example/Commentary” format. (But make sure to adhere to the organizational strategy detailed toward the bottom of this page, and demonstrated in the accompanying PDF.)
Your typed I/P Paper should not exceed one page. Your point size should still be .12, and your composition should still be double-spaced. Also, your margins should meet MLA guidelines. Although your I/P Paper should not exceed one page, a second page will be stapled to it. This will be your Works Cited page. Of course, if you only cite one work, then it will be aptly titled: Work Cited.
Refuting the Opposition
Some of you may be new to refuting the opposition. To refute means “to disprove.” The opposition is the group that opposes your claim. In paragraph two of your Issue/Problem Paper, you must refute the opposition TWICE. In doing so, you must address the two classifications that were not selected. In other words, if you classified those who leave Omelas as Grade One Thinkers, then you must refute the opposition for Grade Two Thinkers and Grade Three Thinkers.
Mistersato411 does a fine job of explaining why we refute the opposition. He does so in his YouTube video, How to Write a Counterargument:
When you refute the opposition in your Issue/Problem Paper, do it like this:
Address the Opposition: Some people argue that . . . .
Identify with the Opposition: This is reasonable. In fact, according to . . . .
Refute the Opposition: However, . . . .
Real-World Refutation
In the real world, you’ve likely witnessed this process in a variety of contexts. Here are some examples:
1. Honda Salesman: So do you want to drive away with this car today?
Me: I do, but it’s a little bit expensive.
Honda Salesman: You’re not alone. A lot of people have that concern. $29,000 is a lot of money. I don’t have $29,000 right now, and most of the people I know don’t have $29,000 right now. But the good news is, you don’t need $29,000 today. You only need $198, and that sounds a lot better, doesn’t it?
Me: Hmmmm.
2. Dad: Okay, it’s your bed time.
Nine-year old Me: I don’t get it. You guys are always trying to make go to bed when I’m not tired, and then you wake me up when I am.
Dad: It’s my way or the highway. Go to bed now.
[NOTICE: He skipped the second step. He did not Identify with the Opposition. Here’s how it might look if he attempted to Identify with the Opposition.]
Dad: Okay, it’s your bed time.
Nine-year old Me: I don’t get it. You guys are always trying to make go to bed when I’m not tired, and then you wake me up when I am.
Dad: I get it. Believe it or not, there are thousands of kids your age having the same conversation with their parents right now. And I understand. I’d rather you stay up. It’d be fun. We could microwave some popcorn and watch some TV together. It’s been a long day, and it’d be fun to hang out with you. But here’s the thing: do you know when kids grow the most?
Nine-year old Me: No.
Dad: When they’re sleeping. Weird, right? Kids grow the most when they’re sleeping. I want you to grow as big and strong as you can. Don’t you?
Nine-year old Me: I don’t know. Yeah, I guess.
Dad: I know you don’t want to go to sleep right now, but you’ll be bigger and stronger because of it. So off to bed champ. We’ll break bread in the morning.
3. Job Interviewer: Over 200 people applied for this position, and most of them have more experience than you. So why should we offer you this position?
You: Yeah. You’re right. Hopefully I can interview with you again once I’ve gotten some experience.
[NOTICE: the Job Interviewer was simply inviting you to refute the opposition. In this case, the opposition consists of the 200 people who might have more experience than you. Don’t end the interview. Instead, refute the opposition by discussing the things you didn’t place on your resume that may count as experience. Or attempt to show why having little experience can be beneficial. Or concede that you may not have as much experience as the others, but you can offer more value in other arenas. Here’s how it might look if you would’ve stayed.]
Job Interviewer: Over 200 people applied for this position, and most of them have more experience than you. So why should we off​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​er you this position?
You: That’s fair. If I were in your shoes, I’d have the same question. After all, I just graduated from college, and aside from my five-month internship at XYZ, I do not have much industry experience. Indeed, the other applicants may have more experience than me. However, what they might not have is my drive and belief. If you were to contact any of my former employers, you’d find that I’m the sort who arrives early and stays late, not for pats on the back or accolades but simply because I believe in the work I do. I’m dedicated, and I’d bring that dedication to your organization. For four years now, I begin each day by reading about your company. And each day simply reinforces why I want to be the newest member of your team.
Job Interviewer: Hmmm. Interesting.
[When you refute the opposition in your Issue/Problem Paper, it will be more academic than the real-world examples. Still, refuting the opposition is a skill that you should be able to acquire in our class and employ in the real-world.]
[Examples of refuting the opposition in your Issue/Problem Paper can be found below.]
is it friday yet
Works Cited
Make sure to compose a Works Cited page for this assignment. Check out Owl Purdue for MLA assistance (Links to an external site.).
You’ll need to create the citation for Thinking as a Hobby. Keep in mind that Thinking as a Hobby appears in your textbook, so you cite Thinking as a Hobby as A Work In An Anthology, as per Owl Purdue. (Links to an external site.)(At a minimum, you’ll need to cite Thinking as a Hobby and The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas.)
Here is the citation for The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas:
Le Guin, Ursula K. “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas.”
https://learning.hccs.edu/faculty/emily.klotz/engl1302-6/readings/the-ones-who-walk-away-from-omelas- (Links to an external site.)
ursula-le-guin/view (Links to an external site.). Accessed 2 March 2020.
Organization
Here’s how your I/P Paper should be organized:
Paragraph One
Claim
Point
Example
Commentary
Commentary (You may only need one sentence of Commentary, depending upon how well you connect your Example to your Point/Claim in your first Commentary.)
Paragraph Two
Address the Opposition
Identify with the Opposition
Refute the opposition
Address the Opposition
Identify with the Opposition
Refute the opposition
First publish
Let’s assume that you’ve read Thinking as a Hobby. And let’s assume that, for the sake of this example, the prompt has been changed to the following: Based on Thinking as a Hobby, please classify William Golding as a Grade One, Two, or Three Thinker. (This is an EXAMPLE, and while I’ve altered this example’s prompt a tad, it should still work as a nice model for the Issue/Problem Paper that you are writing.)
Paragraph One
Claim: Based on Thinking as a Hobby, William Golding is a Grade One Thinker.
Point: Golding offers solutions.
Example: For example, when attempting to explain how his hobby developed, Golding writes: ” . . . I now saw my hobby as an unsatisfactory thing if it went no further” (33).
Commentary: Here, Golding is likely referring to the solutions he employed in order to become a Grade One Thinker.
Commentary: These solutions include speaking with Professor Einstein (34), devising ” . . . a coherent system for living” (34), and rearranging the statuettes to, seemingly, suggest that the Thinker must deliberately face the unknown despite knowing that society’s nature is to attack.
Paragraph Two
Address the Opposition: Some argue that Golding is a Grade Two Thinker.
Identify with the Opposition: This is reasonable. In fact, he detects many contradictions. For instance, he states: ” . . . I felt here were two grade-one thinkers standing side by side; yet I doubt if my face conveyed more than a formless awe” (34). Golding detects a contradiction between his perception of himself and Einstein’s likely perception of Golding. This suggests that Golding is a Grade Two Thinker.
Refute the Opposition: However, even though Golding detects a contradiction, his face eventually conveys “more than a formless awe” when he speaks to Professor Einstein by saying, “Fisch. Ja. Ja” (34). This may seem minimal, but a Grade One Thinker offers solutions. Finding a way to move from nonverbal conveyance to verbal conveyance should constitute a solution, which suggests that Golding remains a Grade One Thinker.
Address the Opposition: Others maintain that Golding is a Grade Three Thinker.
Identify with the Opposition: This, too, is reasonable, for in the aforementioned example, Golding indicates that ” . . . [he] felt here were two grade-one thinkers . . . ” (34). Since Grade Three Thinkers feel instead of think, then Golding’s feeling suggests that he is a Grade Three Thinker.
Refute the Opposition: However, it is likely that each grade of thinking builds upon one another. In other words, ” . . . [he] felt . . . ” (34), ” . . . [he] doubted . . . ” (34), and he finally communicated by saying “Fisch. Ja. Ja” (34). He had to feel before he could doubt, and he had to doubt before he could solve. Golding seemed to rely on Grade Three Thinking and Grade Two Thinking to arrive at his likely classification: Grade One Thinker.
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Well, you might be wondering if this will all fit onto one page. Remember, an Issue/Problem Paper cannot exceed one page, AND YOU MUST adhere to MLA guidelines (1 inch margins, Times New Roman, .12, double-spacing). If you suspect that it might not all fit . . . you’re right! Have a look at this PDF, which reveals a second publish AND a third publish of what you see above.
To be clear, please do the following:
1. Read this: Sample Issue/Problem Paper–two publishs.
2. Please have a look at the Checklist.
3. Make sure to read the Rubric below.
4. And triple-check to make sure that you are formatting your Paper 1 as per MLA 8th Edition. Here’s a model with specifics regarding heading, margins, font, and spa​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​cing.

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